Michaelmas 2016

Posted by: Chris Nelson   -   Posted in: News- Oct 02, 2016 Comments Off on Michaelmas 2016

The weather could not have been more cooperative: sun, not a drop of rain, and just cold enough for the many varieties of warm soup to hit the spot. It was a joy to see old and new faces at the festival, including many alumni. Thanks to everyone for joining us in a wonderful celebration! May your autumn and winter months be filled with joy, with family and friends and the spirit of community, and enough time for quiet reflection and gratitude.

screen-shot-2016-10-30-at-9-54-52-pm

Taming the dragon…

screen-shot-2016-10-30-at-9-48-33-pm

Bobbing for apples…

screen-shot-2016-10-30-at-9-49-04-pm

Seeking out the dragon’s gold…

May Faire 2016

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: News, School Culture- May 02, 2016 Comments Off on May Faire 2016

Photos courtesy of Roxanne Spiegel, Terresa Davis, and Cam LaFlam

May Faire 2016_All_School-34

May Faire 2016_All_School-4

May Faire 2016_All_School-102

109

image2

305

May Faire 2016_All_School-50

May Faire 2016_All_School-99

078

086

May Faire 2016_All_School-27

May Faire 2016_All_School-13

May Faire 2016_All_School-130

186

image5

May Faire 2016_All_School-170

certified crown maker smaller image

316

064

Meet the Team: Adel Krupp, Grade Two Teacher

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: News- Jan 11, 2016 Comments Off on Meet the Team: Adel Krupp, Grade Two Teacher

Meet the Team is a monthly series that showcases the wonderful faculty and staff at Bright Water School.

This edition’s special guest is Grade Two Teacher, Adel Krupp.

0147

1. Are you a believer in New Year’s Resolutions? If you created any for yourself, what are they?

No. I like to set intentions for my year but they do not typically take the form of set goals that I need to achieve by a certain time. This year, my intention is to learn to play the ukulele, to deepen my yoga practice and run more, and to play more with my children.

2. Do you have any favorite holiday traditions or activities for winter time?

Over the years, I have created a set of table puppets for the Christmas story including many animals, shepherds, and the Magi. In the first couple weeks of December, each day a character appears on our nature/Advent table as we sing carols together as a family. On Christmas Eve, my husband and I perform the entire story for our children while weaving traditional Hungarian and English songs into it. Towards the end of winter we also celebrate the Bahá’í festival,  Ayyam-i-Há (translated as Days of Joy), which is a time of gift giving, fellowship, and charity before a period of fasting begins as a preparation for the Bahá’í new year. We also look for opportunities to play in the snow as much as we can.

3. Why does Waldorf education move you to teach?

Waldorf education offers me the freedom to respond to the needs of the particular class based on Steiner’s insights into childhood development. I continue to be amazed at how well the Waldorf curriculum meets the children at each developmental stage. It brings incredible joy into my life every day to step into the classroom and lead the children along the path of human development; academic, social, and emotional. It is also a privilege to be pushed towards my limits each year in my own self-development as I prepare myself intellectually and artistically to serve the next step in my students’ education. I love the idea of following a class for many years and witness the progression as students mature.

4. When was the last time you did something for the first time?

Last week I started learning the ukulele. My hope is that I can soon bring some musical accompaniment to singing in our second grade class.

5. What was the best thing you read (novel, story, poem, article) in 2015?

Abraham Verghese’s novel, “Cutting for Stone.”

6. How did you originally become interested and involved in teaching?

I had a few amazing teachers that stand out as inspiring motivators that challenged us beyond the norms of the classroom. My middle school biology teacher, who relentlessly pushed us towards our limits academically during the school day, created a rock band from the students who played in the orchestra, and introduced me to cave climbing. He always looked for a student’s strengths and gave that student opportunities to shine, something I like to do for my second graders. My high school Latin and history teacher was also instrumental in inspiring me towards becoming a  teacher. While I dreaded many Latin classes for not being able to translate Homer to her liking, her archaeology camps were unparalleled in many ways.

 7. Is there a musical instrument you don’t play, but you wish you did? Why?

I have long been inspired to learn ukulele and, this Christmas, Santa finally made my dream come true. As for what is next, I used to play didgeridoo with friends in Hungary and would like to take it up again. Besides liking the sound of it, its breathing technique gives you an exhilarating sensation.

The Physic(s)al World in Math Class

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: Math- Nov 12, 2015 Comments Off on The Physic(s)al World in Math Class

By Lizza Vachon

There are layers to the world, I tell my eighth graders.

Here at school we get a chance to uncover some of those layers.  We look at the world and peel back a layer of art, studying the quirk in Mona Lisa’s smile.  We lift an edge of history, and hear the roar of a populace in revolution.  In another corner, another curl, and poetry spills out.  Each layer can be looked at independently, but there’s something unique that comes from looking at the whole.  In biology, this is called emergence; it simply means that the whole is more than the sum of its parts.

Equations of numbers alone are number patterns, relationships between variables and constants. As much beauty as there might be in those numbers and patterns, it is a static, meaningless beauty – a beauty of order without significance.  When we talk about equations in math – linear, exponential, quadratic – I think it’s important for students to know why, as human beings, we’re so interested in these particular patterns. Which is where my prospector’s hammer comes in.

For the first part of the year, my students have been debating the definition of an equation, trying to create them from word problems and given data, and graphing them.  As an end of unit project, I asked them to put all of these skills together, and, given a physics equation, create a demonstration to show others what their graphs represented.  Each group – Force = mass/area,  Frequency = 1/time, Density = mass/volume, and Weight=mass (gravity) – got to work reading provided material and talking among themselves to understand their equation and think about where and how it might appear in the world.

A prospector’s hammer has two ends, one with a square head, and the other with a pointed tip.  Can you guess which group used it?

DSC_0304

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another group dropped a squishy dodge-ball (with permission of course) from the second story window to show their equation . . . 

DSC_0288

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yet another group brought a flute along . . . 

DSC_0280

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the last group used some materials from the lab to show what happens when density is kept constant . . .

DSC_0261

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s only so much telling and talking about truth to students; good teaching is when they experience it for themselves.  Here are a few quotes from the experience:

“But if we keep mass the same and change weight, gravity changes!  How can gravity change!?” 

“Okay, so what is a Newton?  I mean, if we want to keep force the same, how many Newtons should we use?”  

“So what exactly is density?  I mean, if something weighs more it’s bigger, right?” (Several examples offered) “Ooohhh, yeah, I get it!”  

Student: “Ms. V!  Our equation isn’t working!  The graph is all weird and we can’t figure out what we did wrong!”

 Ms. V [after some looking at and fiddling with numbers]: “Aha!  I know what happened!  Would mass ever be negative?”  

 Student: “Oh! Ha ha! No!”  

“How can we show frequency though?  Do you think it would be okay if we just show what happens [when frequency increases or decreases]?  I mean, you can’t exactly see it directly.”  

And finally, from the reflection I asked my students to do:

“I didn’t realize how useful equations are.” 

“I definitely understand how this [equation] works and what happens when you change each part.” 

“I learned that the world is more complex than I thought.”  

There are layers to the world, I tell my eighth grade students, and each of them, with a wonderful curiosity and a set determination, use all their experiences to observe, understand, and create. They pull from art, history, science, language arts, and math. What emerges is a world alive with equations – leaves falling, stars spinning, balls on the playground arcing (hopefully away from windows), there to illuminate our understanding of the world.

Halloween Parade

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: School Culture- Nov 03, 2015 Comments Off on Halloween Parade

DSC_0261

Skye and Michael Halloween Parade

DSC_0164

DSC_0052

DSC_0294

DSC_0027

DSC_0032

DSC_0136

DSC_0034

DSC_0275

DSC_0051

DSC_0199

DSC_0089
DSC_0081

Meet the Team: Stuart Fluharty, Spanish Teacher

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: News- Oct 12, 2015 Comments Off on Meet the Team: Stuart Fluharty, Spanish Teacher

Meet the Team is a monthly series that showcases the wonderful faculty and staff at Bright Water School.

This edition’s special guest is Spanish Teacher, Stuart Fluharty.

stuart pic 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart pictured with his daughter Alannah

1. You volunteered for the Peace Corps in Honduras. What is an indelible memory for you from that time?

Volunteering for the Peace Corps was a life-changing event in many ways. I learned so much about life, the world, cross-cultural interactions, and myself. Many of my best memories was working up in small mountain villages with the doctors, nurses, and medical staff. It was humbling to see how people we would consider “poor” be so generous, happy, and content with what they have and who they are.

2. I understand you enjoy playing soccer – what about watching it? Do you have a favorite team(s)?

I have played soccer my whole life, but honestly I am not a huge fan of watching games. I do love the passion of the Sounders games (especially going to games). My Honduran team is Maraton, and when I have to decide between Real Madrid and Barcelona, I root for Barcelona.

3. You spent nearly six years living in Honduras. How do you feel like this period in your life changed you?

My entire life changed during the nearly six years in Honduras. What was supposed to be a two year experience after graduating from college lead to learning to deal with conflict/strife, the meeting of my wife, the birth of our first child, and the beginning of my teaching career.

4. What Bright Water School festival, event, or tradition are you most excited about?

I really enjoyed the Michaelmas celebration with the dragon bread, cider, soup, and apple spirals, but I have heard the most students talking about Sugar Plum Faire. I don’t really know exactly what happens yet, but it sounds like a good time.

5. Were you familiar with Waldorf education when you started here? If so, what resonates with you in this pedagogy? If not, what are you learning about Waldorf education through your work?

I had heard about Waldorf education, but I wasn’t very knowledgeable about how it worked. I love seeing and experiencing the creativity and uniqueness that our students, teachers, and families possess. There are many things that are learned here that are imperative for child growth that are being left out or cut from traditional school curriculum.

6. What are your favorite fall meals?

I love just about anything home-cooked. Some fall comfort foods for me are pumpkin pie, fresh apple cider, banana bread, mashed potatoes, and hot soups.

Meet the Team: Cait Platz, Grade One Teacher

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: Community Spotlights- Sep 11, 2015 Comments Off on Meet the Team: Cait Platz, Grade One Teacher

Meet the Team is a monthly series that showcases the wonderful faculty and staff at Bright Water School.

This edition’s special guest is Grade One Teacher, Cait Platz.

Cait Platz family photo
1. How did you originally get involved in teaching?

I have a hunger for knowledge and have continued to become educated through courses and seminars from an early age.  Teaching, which embraces the process of learning, has unfolded for me.  I began at a small one room school house in Jersey City while enrolled in graduate school in Manhattan.  I worked with young children, ages 2 ½ to 5, and I grew from the lessons of Maria Montessori.  “He does it with his hands, by experience, first in play and then through work. The hands are the instruments of man’s intelligence.” (The Absorbent Mind, p. 25) Montessori’s vision of the hands as we engage the world through them became the foundation of my study of education.

2. Why does Waldorf education appeal to you?

I have been most interested in connecting hands on, practical work with intellectual concepts and philosophy.  I feel that the good life happens somewhere in the middle where these realms overlap.  Steiner-Waldorf education promotes balanced interdisciplinary studies, resulting in creative thinking.  Young children relish in pragmatic work while maintaining a strong vision of beauty.  This is seen in their play and later in their main lesson books and projects.  The students I see become immersed in their work, bringing with them overflowing imagination and joy.

3. What’s the last thing you did for the first time?

I recently kayaked on the Hood Canal for the first time.  I have spent plenty of time on the shore working an oyster farm at Dabob Bay but I had never ventured out to explore the canal from the water.  I met a former student there.  I had recently worked with this student in New York so it was rather uncanny to be together in Washington.  Together we spent some time kayaking about and exploring the waters of the Hood Canal.

4. Any fun or memorable stories to share from your time working on a dairy farm?

Dairy work was filled with hard labor and early morning hours.  I had to be up by 4:00 am in 20 degree below weather (with wind chill) for the early kid feeding.  With one eye open and my hat covering the other eye, I’d stumble into my insulated boots and out the door to the parlor to mix up the kid’s breakfast.  It had to be just the right temperature and I’d fill two 5 gallon buckets with 12 black nipples sticking out of the most bottom portion of the bucket.  Then back out into the cold and finally into the goat dairy barn, I’d unlatch the pens on the wall and out would jump very hungry little goats. Before I could turn around they had found a nipple and were drinking contentedly.

Sugar was a full grown American Lamancha milk goat (you know the white goats without ears) and she knew how to keep me awake so early in the morning.  Charismatic and cunning she would chew on my zippers and boot laces while slyly making her way closer to the milking buckets where the kids were feeding.  In a wink Sugar would have her whole head submerged in the bucket and could suck up the milk as fast as if she were drinking out of 20 straws.  Oy vey, Sugar!  She sure was sweet though.

5. What are you most looking forward to at Bright Water School?

I am looking forward to the process of becoming a class family.  It is a wonderful path where we learn a great deal about one another and even more about ourselves.  I also imagine the possibility of making meaningful connections with the eighth grade students and other classes where overlapping experiences might benefit both groups and work toward broadened relationships and a greater feeling of connection.      

6. How do you relax in the summer months?

I appreciate travel and stepping into unfamiliar territory despite that I often feel out of place.  I enjoy travel across this country and the experience of different lifestyles.  I also relish in traveling overseas, especially to study with a group in Switzerland.  I hope to spend more summer months back to Saas-Fee to reconnect with folks there.

7. Who inspires you? Why?

Ingmar Bergman.  I am a big Bergman cinefile and although the complexities in the relationships he builds are not always uplifting I sure enjoy the thought and reflection his work unleashes in me.  There are many great Bergman films and I should not list them all, but I do have a special affinity for Fanny Och Alexander (1982).  I enjoy watching this film yearly around the time of the winter holidays.

Class of 2015 Interviews

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: Community Spotlights- Jun 04, 2015 Comments Off on Class of 2015 Interviews


Beth Simpson, Class of 2015 Teacher

2014-11-25 15.07.14-2

1. How would you describe the Class of 2015?

This is a group of true go-getters. They are smart, energized, enthusiastic, and willing to reach and work for their goals. The students don’t shy away from work. This ‘yes’ group meets my high energy well – we have taken it great places!

2. Do you have a favorite memory or experience with the class from this year? How about prior years?

This year’s class trip, absolutely. It was an incredible week of bonding; a rite of passage for the Class of 2015. Last year’s Renaissance curriculum – the beauty and and vitality of it – was a balm for some of the social struggles in seventh grade. The curriculum met their needs very well. Another field trip that stands out was the sheer fun of the Goldendale Observatory in sixth grade.

3. What was your favorite block to teach this year?

My favorite block to teach was short stories. It was a delight to read fun, taut stories, often with twists at the end. We approached the block from both the creative and the analytical. Creatively, every student (and myself) wrote short stories to share. We also developed vocabulary, grammar knowledge, and analyzed other writers’ short stories.

4. Do any projects from this year stick out to you?

The Class of 2015’s community service projects. A resounding accomplishment. Bright Water School’s mission is to send well-rounded students into the world to serve humanity – this project was an essential stepping stone for the students.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Enjoy every minute. Every minute is so full…and in the end every minute is meaningful. Stay present to your learning, your experiences, and your friendships.

Al

2014-11-25 15.07.06-5 1. Where are you going to high school?

The Northwest School.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Playing saxophone in the upper school jazz band.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Probably “Current Events.” I am interested in modern history and politics.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
The extremely tight-knit community.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Plan ahead!

Ruby

2014-11-25 15.07.06-21. Where are you going to high school?

Garfield.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Meeting new people.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories, because I like literature and writing.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
My friends and teachers.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Try to forget your all your issues in the past, and just be friends.

Tallis

2014-11-25 15.07.04-51. Where are you going to high school?

Holy Names Academy.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Meeting new people and experiencing new things.

3. What was  your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories because it was fun and allowed for creative experiences.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
The great community and welcoming attitude.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Come to school every day and do your homework!

Lyra

2014-11-25 15.07.05-21. Where are you going to high school?

Holy Names Academy.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Meeting new people.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories – it was fun reading all of the stories.

4. What will you miss the most about Bright Water School?
Everything.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Study for Washington State history, and start high school applications early.

Zach

2014-11-25 15.07.05-31. Where are you going to high school?

Shorecrest.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Meet more people, and new people, in my grade.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Anatomy, because I learned physically who I was.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
My friends.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?
Study!

Annelie

2014-11-25 15.07.06-41. Where are you going to high school?

Nathan Hale or Ingraham.

2. What are you looking forward to high school?

To the change.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Anatomy because I want to be a doctor, physical therapist, or radiologist.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
The education style and my friends.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Get a planner so you will be able to write down things you need to do.

Nori

2014-11-25 15.07.05-11. Where are you going to high school?

Holy Names Academy.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Being with Lyra and Tally.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Anatomy because it was fun learning bone structures and drawing skeletons in motion.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
My class and making art.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Study!

Carmen

2014-11-25 15.07.06-31. Where are you going to high school?

Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Continuing to do the things I like, learning new things, and meeting new people.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Anatomy because I find human science interesting.

4. What will you miss the most about Bright Water School?
The community and relationships.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

It only gets better! Do your homework, come to school, and study, study, study.

Suzanna

2014-11-25 15.07.06-11. Where are you going to high school?

Roosevelt.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

New experiences.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories because it was fun!

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
Tight connections, and the kindness and respect of BWS.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Take notes, make good choices, and enjoy your last year while you can.

Dalia

2014-11-25 15.07.04-31. Where are you going to high school?

Seattle Waldorf School.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Seeing the people from my old school.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories, because I got to write stories of my own.

4. What will you miss the most about Bright Water School?
All the people in my class and friends from other classes too.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Make an effort to be really close with everyone in your class.

Miranda

2014-11-25 15.07.06-61. Where are you going to high school?

Seattle Academy of Arts & Sciences.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

New experiences.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Short stories because I like reading, and History because you get to learn interesting things about the past.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
My friends.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Study, do your homework, and be nice.

Emory

2014-11-25 15.07.05-41. Where are you going to high school?

Shorecrest.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Meeting new people.

3. What was your favorite block this year? Why?

Short stories, because I like reading.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
The sense of community.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Don’t gossip – if you have a problem with someone, tell them and talk to them about it.

Jade

2014-11-25 15.07.04-41. Where are you going to high school?

University Prep.

2. What are you looking forward to at high school?

Trying new things, meeting new people, and playing sports.

3. What was your favorite block during Grade Eight? Why?

Drama because I like to act and it was fun.

4. What will you miss most about Bright Water School?
My classmates and my art classes.

5. Do you have any advice for next year’s eighth grade class?

Get in high school applications in early, apply to private schools even if you don’t think you want to go, and make sure to take practice tests!

Grade Three Practical Arts: Shelter Projects

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: Student Work/Class Projects- May 05, 2015 Comments Off on Grade Three Practical Arts: Shelter Projects

The sun spills through the trees in fractured waves, pouring unevenly across the third grade as they orbit the verdant parts of our playground. One student, eyes squinted, carefully adds a brick to the garden plot. Two others puff their chests out and toss and turn the soil with their hoes. The earth matter is warm from the dollops of sun, warmer still from their tilling. They are jovial, attentive. A bustling child, knees soil-sunken, raises her hands high: they are stained with the dark-rooted richness of experience.

I observed Grade Three create and cultivate over the course of a few minutes. This scene isn’t singular. They have cooked, constructed, farmed, and otherwise engaged the body’s theater of ‘practical arts.’ Most recently, and perhaps most individually resonate, is their shelter-building project.

Ms. Chamberlain, Grade Three Class Teacher, echoed stirring stories of shelters the world over: houseboat dwellers in China, the Inuit people of the Arctic region, Bedouin of the Arabian Peninsula, East African mud houses…

With this imaginative ‘living out’ of cultural experiences, the students began to think about a shelter of their choice. They visited the local library to meet their enthusiasm with books best fit to awaken their ideas.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Soon, with the support of their parents, the guidance of Ms. Chamberlain, and a litany of building materials singing out to them, the third graders spent a week of main lessons excitedly creating their shelter homes.


Let us take a tour, then…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Viking Longhouse

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Log Cabin

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cajun Cottage

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tipi

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mongolian Yurt

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Igloo

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The White House

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Four Square House

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Great Pyramid

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sunwatch Stockade

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fort Clatsop

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Recycled House

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tipi

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Layered Tower

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clochan

Middle School Ultimate Frisbee “Spring Reign” Recap

Posted by: David Bergler   -   Posted in: Extracurriculars, News- May 01, 2015 Comments Off on Middle School Ultimate Frisbee “Spring Reign” Recap

By Ultimate Coach and Parent John Healy

The Middle School’s “Commotion” Ultimate team made an impressive run last weekend at Spring Reign, the world’s largest youth Ultimate tournament, in Burlington, WA. The team entered the mid-season tournament with high hopes after compiling a 5-0 record in Disc Northwest league play. After defeating teams from Eckstein Middle School, The Evergreen School, and Pacific Crest School during Saturday’s preliminary round, the team found itself a top seed in Sunday’s B Division Championship round.

2015-04-26 14.20.58

 

Commotion bested friends from Three Cedars Waldorf School in the quarterfinals, then beat a talented and spirited team from University Prep in the semifinals. The team played powerful Aki Kurose Middle School in the championship, losing 10-7, in a game that was exciting from beginning to end. The second-place finish is a best-ever for Bright Water School at Spring Reign, a true Ultimate festival of some 2,000 players on 96 middle- and high-school teams from across the Northwest and Western Canada.

One of the reasons we love Ultimate at Bright Water School is its emphasis on the Spirit of the Game: fairness, sportsmanship, and equanimity that is required in a sport where the players are responsible for officiating their own play. Commotion players should be proud that they carried themselves with grace and even temper in both victory and defeat at Spring Reign. And their gift to opponents of a “Spirit Pineapple” at the end of each game might just become a yummy Bright Water tradition!

2015-04-26 15.41.25

 

Commotion finishes its regular league season at 4:30 p.m. this Saturday, May 2 at Woodland Park, before heading into the playoffs on May 9 and May 16.

(Photos Courtesy of Jacek Cameron-Rulkowski)